On Friday, we’re launching a crowdfunder campaign for Culture Skatepark. This is basically a way for you to get directly involved with the skatepark project, and donate money for rewards and incentives (such as skate sessions, exclusive insider info on progress for the park, and VIP entry to the opening event). We’re hoping to raise a small pool of cash that we can use to do all of the boring startup stuff. 

The video above is our pitch for the campaign - give it a watch, and make sure you attend the fundraiser event for the skatepark on Saturday!

Starley Road residents meeting

Keeping this short and sweet. We met with residents at vicroft court flats (next to Ikea), about people skating in town. Here’s what was discussed;

- The noise of people skating Ikea and the arcade is why the residents have complained.
- They understand we want somewhere to skate, and are willing to help find funding for Culture Skatepark.
- All they want is for people to consider where they skate; if it’s late and near flats/housing, it’s probably not a good idea to skate there.
- They want to help identify a ‘legal’ place to skate in town where we can skate without getting the boot.

If anyone is kicked off from Ikea or Arcade, please try and be polite and move on. Nobody’s looking for beef (or horse if you shop at Tesco).

We’ve been a tad quiet recently - as normal this usually happens around this time of year! Don’t worry though, we have a lot of stuff in the works. Hibernate Skate 2012 is still in full swing, with Terribleco’s edit coming on nicely and we still have the final episode of 4 Horseman (starring Chris Mander) to come before the year is out, too. Once we hit 2013 (which is our ten year anniversary!), we have a very special January edit for you all. Work has also officially started on Terribleco’s next proper skate video, so look out for more details on that soon!

In the meantime, click the link above, and get liking the page. Culture Skatepark is looking to ramp up work on opening the park this year - after a year full of planning, meetings, looking at buildings and raising awareness (Summer Jam included), we’ve finally moved onto designing the park and locking down a premises. Summer 2013 is a speculative opening time, so keep your eyes pinned to the facebook page and see the progress live - all starting with the very first official design idea created by myself (Ade), Adam Woodward and Emily Martin!!! 

Those Kenilworth chaps have only gone and bloody won Transform Your Patch! By receiving the most votes they have bagged a sweet £23,500 for their skatepark, and there is a good possibility of match funding being stumped up to DOUBLE that number. With the good news, the locals are eyeing up a complete revamp of the skatepark - meaning a clear out of the old, rusty, warped Woodward ramps and a nice, shiny, new concrete plaza. More details soon.
A major amount of props to Zac and the Kenilworth lads, this is a major achievement and definitely a huge step for skateboarding facilities in Coventry and Warwickshire.

Those Kenilworth chaps have only gone and bloody won Transform Your Patch! By receiving the most votes they have bagged a sweet £23,500 for their skatepark, and there is a good possibility of match funding being stumped up to DOUBLE that number. With the good news, the locals are eyeing up a complete revamp of the skatepark - meaning a clear out of the old, rusty, warped Woodward ramps and a nice, shiny, new concrete plaza. More details soon.

A major amount of props to Zac and the Kenilworth lads, this is a major achievement and definitely a huge step for skateboarding facilities in Coventry and Warwickshire.

The guys over in Leamington are in the process of setting up a charity in order to provide the town with a decent skatepark (If you’ve been to Newbold Comyn Skatepark, you’ll know that Leamington’s skateboarding facilities are far below average). They’re aiming to get a small park built by Wheelscape, which will replace the Victoria Park mini ramp that was removed quite a while ago, as well as add some street obstacles to provide an alternative place to skate some ledges (those of you who remember the old mini, will also remember the old “ledge-tastic” paddling pool that was used as a small plaza when it was drained).

I cannot stress how important it is that you like the page linked above on Facebook. Whilst Cov has always been provided with bare minimum concrete skateparks, Warwickshire have had to make do with awful ramps made from metal and wood (obviously not the best material for a skatepark in the UK) for years, and it was only recently that Stratford replaced the rotten wooden ramps with some concrete, and Kenilworth got the L block installed, although these results leave a lot to be desired. Even though there are a few “bodge-job” concrete installations being put in around Warwickshire, the local skaters have been pushing for something a bit better (Kenilworth have almost gained £25,000 for their project, whilst will be a start towards a larger extension of the park). Leamington have had it pretty bad overall, with the one half decent place to skate being taken away due to the ramp rotting underneath, and then being told a replacement would not be provided. I’ve always heard rumours that Leamington’s policy on street skating has been overly harsh (fines for skating any spots on or around the parade?), and with no proper alternative place to skate, any punishment for street skating at all is unacceptable.

The charity has been set up by Alex Walker, who some of you may recognise as being a long-time Leamington skater. He’s ideally placed to head the project and has big ideas - it’s time everyone in the Cov and Warwickshire area banded together to push forward all of these new park projects… Because, seriously, we need ‘em.

The results are in…

We were provided with the results from the survey on offer at the Summer Jam! Some good information; it would seem that everyone is behind the idea of Culture Skatepark providing an indoor facility in Cov (the majority of people said they wanted a new skatepark to be indoors). There was also a demand for street obstacles, with a lot of people citing “rails” as an obstacle they wanted to ride - the numbers were fairly even between those who prefer to skate transition and street obstacles; banks and ledges had an even spread, with slightly more preference to transition, and slightly less preference towards stairs.

Not surprisingly, the majority of the users for the Summer Jam’s temporary park were skateboarders. We kind’ve expected more BMXers, but we put their low numbers down to the lack of a decent sized mini ramp - and given the transition-centric nature of the Cov BMX scene we felt like a lot of the riders didn’t get on well with the street obstacles on offer. Some of the guys got stuck in though (as the comp proved!).

A lot of people gave “dud” answers for their favourite parks; they put down parks that didn’t necessarily help our cause and didn’t show the Council what to look at for inspiration. I was disappointed to see a lot of people claiming their favourite parks were Covpark, Alan Higgs, and even the Annix… Use your imaginations, and get travelling. I was shocked to see a lot of people just don’t travel out of Cov, so haven’t even experienced parks like Midsomer Norton, Hereford or even Stoke Plaza and Smith’s Wood in Solihull. It’s for these reasons more than any other that a new, well-designed skatepark is needed in our city - how can people improve and experience unique and interesting obstacles when the only park they ever ride is the Annix?

Lastly, a mixture of different comments on a proposed skatepark. A few people asking for foam pits (which I see absolutely NO reason for… they smell, people’s keys and phones get lost in them and they take up an unnecessary amount of space for something to just “practice” on), someone asking for an age limit (come on now, the young’uns have just as much right to ride a skatepark as anyone else), and someone even said “today was shit make the skatepark better” (hmm… how about you stump up the cash and organise your own event… it’s not about people being horribly ungrateful for something we all put a lot of work into). What did come across was that everyone wants a better skatepark and that they are willing to co-operate with the Council on a new park (which is what we’ve told them ALL ALONG).

The best part of all of this, was during our de-briefing session with the Council, we were told they want to do the Summer Jam AGAIN next year!!! In the mean time, they want to get involved with helping Culture on the road to gaining a premises and funding - which will be a long process. A long way to go, but we’ve covered a lot of ground….

What can I say? The Summer Jam is now officially over, and it was awesome. Thanks to all of you who turned up to support Cov Skateboarding - cheers to the BMXers and inliners who represented their own scenes (there weren’t as many of you as I was hoping, but those who showed up had a good time). The inline street comps were cancelled because no bladers turned up for it. Adam and Kafka from Culture Skatepark (who happen to be bladers) were a little bit let down. Having said that, Adam got involved with the skateboarding mini ramp comp to support Cov skateboarders, and almost got a rock n roll down!
The comp day, other than the lack of bladers, was a big success. Big tricks, awesome vibe, fun day. Here are the winners;
Transition Titan (mini ramp);
Skate - Finley Kirkby (from Leicester), Inline - Elliot
Long Jump (BMX jump ramp comp) - Ricky
Chief of the Streets (street comp);
Skateboard best run; Martins Neimanis
What else needs to be said but “consistency”. Martins didn’t do the BEST trick of the comp, but the tricks he did do were sick and very consistent. Switch heels, 360 flips, 180 switch manuals, back tails, pretty much all on-lock. You could time your watch by him.
Skateboard best trick; Tony Lui
Tony Lui didn’t do just one best trick. He did about 3. He did a nosegrind and a bluntslide along the blue adidas wallie block, and he took to the pyramid manny pad, with a quick ollie up then an bs 180 over the second part of the pyramid to flat. Quick footed is an understatement.
Honourable mention; Joe Morris. He did the most well-balanced nosegrind over the Gonz funbox. Until Tony got the Bluntslide and the BS 180, Joe was the pick for best trick.
BMX best run; Ben Covill
Rugby massive came along and shut down the comp. Tony Lui walked away with skateboard best trick, whilst Ben Covill got on the park and really showed the BMXers how to ride a street course. Consistent tailwhips off the curb high manny pad (how he managed that I’ll never know), and not to mention thowing a FLAIR into his run in the final round (on a 3.5 high, 2 foot wide quarter?????) showed his skill and consistency.
Honourable mention; Greenman, and Ricky - both of these guys have 360’s on lock, and Greenman was throwing out 360 barspins like hotcakes.
BMX best trick; Jake Thrip
The theme of the BMX street comp seemed to be “going upside down”. Jake Thrip backflipped off of a 3 foot high kicker ramp (to flat), not once… but THREE times. His best attempt was definitely the first one, as he rolled away sitting down with his feet off the pedals… BACKFLIP TO NO FOOTED LANDING??? Give that kid a prize. Tom McKay agreed.
If you didn’t at least make a small appearance or support this event in some way, then what else can I say? You missed out. This was our chance to really show the council how big our scene is, and how providing an interesting and unique skatepark facility can attract big numbers. If anything was going to get the council to go ahead with a new skatepark, it was this. With about 300 individual users, and almost 500 sign-ins (that means that most of the 300 users came back to skate the park at least once), they appear to be on our side. Culture Skatepark are now moving with full force to push for their indoor skatepark plan - despite some people questioning whether this event would do any good, or whether it was worth the cash spent on it, I can honestly say I feel it was totally worth the effort. If we end up with a decent skatepark in the next year (or if one is on the way in the next year), then I will definitely say it was worth it.

What can I say? The Summer Jam is now officially over, and it was awesome. Thanks to all of you who turned up to support Cov Skateboarding - cheers to the BMXers and inliners who represented their own scenes (there weren’t as many of you as I was hoping, but those who showed up had a good time). The inline street comps were cancelled because no bladers turned up for it. Adam and Kafka from Culture Skatepark (who happen to be bladers) were a little bit let down. Having said that, Adam got involved with the skateboarding mini ramp comp to support Cov skateboarders, and almost got a rock n roll down!

The comp day, other than the lack of bladers, was a big success. Big tricks, awesome vibe, fun day. Here are the winners;

Transition Titan (mini ramp);

Skate - Finley Kirkby (from Leicester), Inline - Elliot

Long Jump (BMX jump ramp comp) - Ricky

Chief of the Streets (street comp);

Skateboard best run; Martins Neimanis

What else needs to be said but “consistency”. Martins didn’t do the BEST trick of the comp, but the tricks he did do were sick and very consistent. Switch heels, 360 flips, 180 switch manuals, back tails, pretty much all on-lock. You could time your watch by him.

Skateboard best trick; Tony Lui

Tony Lui didn’t do just one best trick. He did about 3. He did a nosegrind and a bluntslide along the blue adidas wallie block, and he took to the pyramid manny pad, with a quick ollie up then an bs 180 over the second part of the pyramid to flat. Quick footed is an understatement.

Honourable mention; Joe Morris. He did the most well-balanced nosegrind over the Gonz funbox. Until Tony got the Bluntslide and the BS 180, Joe was the pick for best trick.

BMX best run; Ben Covill

Rugby massive came along and shut down the comp. Tony Lui walked away with skateboard best trick, whilst Ben Covill got on the park and really showed the BMXers how to ride a street course. Consistent tailwhips off the curb high manny pad (how he managed that I’ll never know), and not to mention thowing a FLAIR into his run in the final round (on a 3.5 high, 2 foot wide quarter?????) showed his skill and consistency.

Honourable mention; Greenman, and Ricky - both of these guys have 360’s on lock, and Greenman was throwing out 360 barspins like hotcakes.

BMX best trick; Jake Thrip

The theme of the BMX street comp seemed to be “going upside down”. Jake Thrip backflipped off of a 3 foot high kicker ramp (to flat), not once… but THREE times. His best attempt was definitely the first one, as he rolled away sitting down with his feet off the pedals… BACKFLIP TO NO FOOTED LANDING??? Give that kid a prize. Tom McKay agreed.



If you didn’t at least make a small appearance or support this event in some way, then what else can I say? You missed out. This was our chance to really show the council how big our scene is, and how providing an interesting and unique skatepark facility can attract big numbers. If anything was going to get the council to go ahead with a new skatepark, it was this. With about 300 individual users, and almost 500 sign-ins (that means that most of the 300 users came back to skate the park at least once), they appear to be on our side. Culture Skatepark are now moving with full force to push for their indoor skatepark plan - despite some people questioning whether this event would do any good, or whether it was worth the cash spent on it, I can honestly say I feel it was totally worth the effort. If we end up with a decent skatepark in the next year (or if one is on the way in the next year), then I will definitely say it was worth it.

The Summer Jam: Session One Reflection

I’m going to be honest with you all here. I joke around on this blog and use silly names for photographers, and continually reference the daftness of skateboarding. But amongst this silliness and unintentional comedy, I have a nugget of thoughtfulness and emotion to bestow.

At one point, I questioned, quite heavily, whether the effort for The Summer Jam was worth it. 


I had never worked on an event of this scale. Covpark Combat was nothing compared to this. As a 26 year old skateboarder with a full time job, I almost felt like this was too much work and effort for Emily, The Council, the event sponsors and myself. I had, unfortunately, become complacent and disillusioned with Coventry Skateboarding to the point that I was considering the dismantling of Terribleco next year. Nothing definite, but I had ran out of roads to go down and felt like Coventry was a damned place beyond saving - no wider recognition for the scene, no decent parks, not a whole lot going on. A small city where no one escapes and no one enters. I needed a serious spark to remind me why I bothered starting this blog - The Summer Jam, thus far, has been that spark.

After all of the headaches and questioning whether the effort was worth it… I can honestly say it was, just because people were so stoked on it. Even those who haven’t been down yet are looking forward to next week’s session because the response has been so positive. After 4 years of meeting with the council, seeing plans for skateparks go down the drain, making contacts who then go quiet and eventually disappear off the radar, we’re finally seeing some kind of return that seems more likely to lead to a proper skatepark than ever before. These 3 days have done more good than any paper petition or formal letter could. Despite the bumps in the road the council see skatepark users as a legitimate group, and are beginning to feel like they need to provide an adequate facility.

I haven’t seen something like this bring the scene together in such a way in a long time as well… I used to go down to Covpark, or the Herbert, and I’d skate around feeling like everyone was kind’ve keeping themselves to themselves, not embracing the fact that there are other people on skateboards zipping around. In response I’d keep quiet and just copy everyone else. I’d turn up to a skatepark, only to feel like kids on BMX bikes, rollerblades or scooters don’t want me there because I’m on a plank with wheels; no one bothered to talk to someone who was riding something different to them - needless to say compassion had left the skatepark.

Over the last 3 days, however, I’d get down to the Transport Museum and see people I don’t really skate with that often anymore, and have a good laugh with them as we skate something truly new and interesting. I’d get chatting to BMXers I don’t really know, as well as the older lads who I used to see down Covpark every summer when I first started skating. Even the scooter riders during their own session seemed to be much happier riding the temporary park, as it was new and different. It’s the same kind of vibe that only comes from people truly enjoying themselves and genuinely having fun. As a whole it has brought the community of people who do “wheeled sports” closer together in this city, and that might very well be something this city has needed for some time. 

Coventry needs you. Get over to the Transport Museum between the 9th and 11th of August, show your support by riding the temporary park, and let’s push this thing further.

Covpark Combat is no more… This is THE SUMMER JAM. 6 days worth of awesomeness, with a temporary skatepark outside the Transport Museum, all paid for and supported by Coventry City Council??!!! It’s like Covpark Combat and the Ride demo collided head on and created the best thing since sliced bread.
The 6 days in question are broken into two 3 day sessions - check the poster for times, dates and the all important final day comp. There will also be a small area on-site with a display about the Cov Skate Scene organised by Emily Martin; she’s currently looking for stories about YOUR experiences skating in Cov (how it’s been a hugely positive effect on your lives, etc). Drop her an email with your thoughts and they could be featured at this event! Culture Skatepark will also be there to help run the event and show off their newest park designs. Check out the Facebook Page and make your digital mark if you’re gonna be there (and you all better be there!).
Terribleco just got legit.

Covpark Combat is no more… This is THE SUMMER JAM. 6 days worth of awesomeness, with a temporary skatepark outside the Transport Museum, all paid for and supported by Coventry City Council??!!! It’s like Covpark Combat and the Ride demo collided head on and created the best thing since sliced bread.

The 6 days in question are broken into two 3 day sessions - check the poster for times, dates and the all important final day comp. There will also be a small area on-site with a display about the Cov Skate Scene organised by Emily Martin; she’s currently looking for stories about YOUR experiences skating in Cov (how it’s been a hugely positive effect on your lives, etc). Drop her an email with your thoughts and they could be featured at this event! Culture Skatepark will also be there to help run the event and show off their newest park designs. Check out the Facebook Page and make your digital mark if you’re gonna be there (and you all better be there!).

Terribleco just got legit.

Ollie Deeley has put together this awesome documentary highlighting the problems with Covpark and why it’s important that it is extended (and repaired). There’s also an interesting interview with a PCSO which raises some points from the council/law enforcement side.